All Business News
Top stories summarized by our editors
1/15/2018

Teams need specifics when it comes to quantitative goals such as setting a monthly target for sales contacts and conversions instead of just an overall revenue goal, writes Mike Figliuolo. Measuring the qualitative health of a company is equally important, if sometimes more indirectly measured, he writes.

Full Story:
ThoughtLeaders
More Summaries:
Mike Figliuolo
1/15/2018

A shrinking labor pool has employers hiring people they normally might pass over, such as those with a criminal record and those who have been out of work. The shift has put more prime-age workers -- people ages 25 to 54 -- into the workforce, economists say.

More Summaries:
labor market
1/15/2018

When people say leaders must show vulnerability, what they really mean is leaders should be human and approachable, writes David Brock. "Rather than setting leaders on pedestals, thinking of them as 'different,' aren't we better off thinking of them as human, trying to excel in their job -- just like all of us?" Brock writes.

More Summaries:
David Brock
1/15/2018

US economic growth is much of the reason for an increased trade deficit with China, writes Salvatore Babones. "In a strong economy, a big trade deficit simply means that more capital is flowing into a country than is flowing out," Babones writes.

Full Story:
Forbes
More Summaries:
US, Salvatore Babones, China
1/15/2018

The best way to begin a speech is to explain what people can gain from listening to it, Salma Jafri says. Save personal anecdotes until your audience understands what they can learn from you.

Full Story:
Entrepreneur online
1/15/2018

Residents and visitors in Hawaii received an urgent alert Saturday about an incoming ballistic missile, which was confirmed 38 minutes later as a false alarm. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii, said the mistake emphasizes the need for President Donald Trump to negotiate with North Korea on denuclearization.

1/15/2018

While a false alert about an incoming missile had never reached the public before Saturday's alert in Hawaii, there have been several false alarms within the US government since nuclear weapons were developed. In 1960, radar mistook the moon rising over Norway as inbound missiles, and in 1979 a technician accidentally inserted a "war game" tape into a computer, which simulated a missile attack.

More Summaries:
US, nuclear weapons, Hawaii
1/15/2018

When Dennis Miller took over a medical center in need of change, he soon learned that, without intentional listening, all the changes he wanted to make would only scare employees without getting their input. "The simple act of listening to employees across your organization will give you a ground-up view of everything that is happening in your organization," he writes.

Full Story:
SmartBrief/Leadership
More Summaries:
Dennis Miller
1/15/2018

Retailers are experimenting with automation, as seen with Walmart using robots to restock and JD.com's plans to open convenience stores without employees, but it's unlikely every retailer will someday be a vending machine without floor personnel, writes Barry Levine. Customer service is the hallmark of higher-end brands, and the human component may be irreplaceable, he writes.

Full Story:
MarTech Today
More Summaries:
Barry Levine, Walmart
1/15/2018

Productivity is less of a concern for writer Austin Kleon than knowing what to do with a good idea. "Really, the best way I know to see something through is to get yourself a calendar, put an X in the day's box after you do your work, and don't break the chain," he writes.

Full Story:
Austin Kleon blog
More Summaries:
Austin Kleon