STEM Careers
Top stories summarized by our editors
1/16/2018

Lawmakers in Michigan are considering legislation that would require students receive more career information in high school and build a talent portfolio. Education and business leaders hope the legislation, which would make it necessary for schools to hire additional counselors, would address a skills gap and help get students interested in careers in skilled trades.

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Michigan Radio
1/16/2018

Lawmakers in West Virginia are considering a measure to help career and technical education students secure funding for college. Under the West Virginia Invests Grant Program, after students have exhausted all available sources of funding, including grants and scholarships, the state would cover the students' tuition.

1/16/2018

Culinary students in a Washington state school are learning skills to help prepare for jobs in the food industry by making lunches daily. The students cook many dishes from scratch using locally sourced food.

1/16/2018

Officials in a Kentucky community are considering whether to lower the age of consideration for firefighter candidates to 20 from 21. If approved, 20-year-olds who have earned associate degrees in fire/rescue science technology from the Kentucky Community & Technical College System would be considered.

1/16/2018

Many nurses are getting advanced degrees and taking on expanded roles in health care, and New Jersey State Nurses Association President Benjamin Evans says they fill in the gaps in areas where there is a shortage of physicians. Mary Ann Donohue-Ryan, Englewood Hospital and Medical Center's chief nursing officer, is worried there are not enough nurses to replace those nearing retirement, but Edna Cadmus of the New Jersey Collaborating Center for Nursing at Rutgers University notes the number of nurses going back to school for a bachelor's degree has doubled.

1/16/2018

Humans, not rats, were largely responsible for spreading bubonic plague during medieval times, a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences suggests. Researchers created three models to simulate the spread of the disease in Europe between 1347 and 1351, and the model with fleas and lice found on humans and their clothes best fit the spread of the plague.

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BBC
1/16/2018

A duck-sized dinosaur that lived 161 million years ago had a lustrous array of colorful feathers on its head, wings and tail, according to a study of its pigment-containing melanosomes. "We were really excited when we realized the level of detail we were able to see on the feathers," said Chad Eliason, co-author of the study published online in Nature Communications.

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LiveScience
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Nature Communications
1/16/2018

A number of owls in California have been exposed to rat poison likely coming from illegal marijuana farms in the state, according to findings published in Avian Conservation and Ecology. Researchers examined nearly 100 owls and found evidence of rodenticide in more than 40 of them.

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California, marijuana
1/16/2018

A number of companies are offering genetic testing to give couples a glimpse of how their potential offspring might look or behave by testing their DNA, but some experts are concerned that consumers might take the results, meant as entertainment, too seriously. "Once you think you know certain information, it'll affect how you think about your baby for life," said Dr. Muin Khoury, director of the CDC's Office of Public Health Genomics.

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Wired online
1/16/2018

Extremely creative thinkers are better able to coordinate connections between three brain regions associated with creativity: the default network, the salience network and the executive control network. "You have these three different systems that are all located in different parts of the brain, but they are all co-activated at once," said Roger Beaty, lead author of the study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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LiveScience