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1/17/2018

An emergency department nurse improperly accessed the health records of 1,309 patients at Palomar Health in Escondido, Calif., between Feb. 10, 2016, and May 7, 2017, a hospital spokesman said. The information accessed included patients' names, medical record numbers, medications and dates of birth, but financial and/or insurance information was accessed in only four cases.

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Palomar Health
1/17/2018

Research links a Mediterranean diet to multiple health benefits, but unlike commercial diets that spell out what foods to eat, a Mediterranean plan is more about maintaining a general lifestyle and eating pattern, said registered dietitian Suzy Weems. Weems and RD Liz Weinandy say fruits and vegetables are the focus of a Mediterranean style diet, along with nuts and legumes, whole grains, lean protein and healthy fats.

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TIME online
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Suzy Weems, Liz Weinandy
1/17/2018

Veterinarian Julie Cavin has provided care to more than 850 cold-stunned sea turtles that have been rescued from unseasonably cold Florida waters since the first week of January and taken to the Gulf World Marine Institute. The comatose turtles are revived in small pools and examined for broken bones or other injuries, Dr. Cavin said.

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CBS News
1/17/2018

Dogs and people are prone to many of the same cancers, and clinical trials conducted in canine patients may ultimately benefit both, researchers say. Pet dogs are excellent cancer avatars not only because of their genetic similarity to people, but also because they live in the same environments we do, notes veterinarian and oncologist Douglas Thamm.

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American Veterinarian
1/17/2018

A study of opossums, rabbits, armadillos and hyraxes showed that placental mammals evolved to mute an inflammatory response to an egg implanting in the placenta, thus enabling extended gestation. Decidual cells, which form in the uterine lining early in pregnancy, persist through delivery in mice and humans but disappear quickly in many other placental mammals, suggesting that cells might moderate the inflammatory response and result in miscarriage if the process goes awry.

1/17/2018

The p.Ser64Phe mutation in the MAFA gene is likely associated with a type of non-insulin-dependent diabetes and multiple insulin-producing neuroendocrine tumors, according to a study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. UK researchers studied the DNA of 39 adults from two families with diabetes and autosomal dominant insulinomatosis and nine people with sporadic insulinomatosis and found that "the p.Ser64Phe mutation not only significantly increased the stability of MAFA, whose levels were unaffected by variable glucose concentrations in [beta]-cell lines, but also enhanced its transactivation activity."

1/17/2018

Jeanne Henry of the American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities says a common deficiency in regard to advance directives is that patient records often lack patient acknowledgement of advance directive receipt. States that have electronic advance directive registries make it easier to obtain and maintain patient directives.

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Becker's ASC Review
1/17/2018

Mission Health in Asheville, N.C., has seen an increase in the use of its Mission Virtual Clinic telemedicine program since its launch in October 2016, with a record 178 total patient visits in November. The platform integrates the provider's Cerner EHR system with telemedicine technology from Zipnosis, allowing patients to receive services such as influenza and strep throat testing through the virtual clinic.

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Healthcare IT News
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Zipnosis
1/17/2018

Shine Medical Technologies has received $25 million from the federal government to build its $100 million radioisotope plant in Janesville, Wis., to produce molybdenum-99 in an effort to address the isotope's uncertain supply. Molybdenum-99 is sourced from six government-owned nuclear research reactors outside the US, but supply chain issues are a concern, and some federal scientists say major shortages are a possibility.

1/17/2018

House Republicans have unveiled a short-term spending bill that would keep the federal government open through Feb. 16, extend funding for the Children's Health Insurance Program for six years, suspend the health insurance tax for one year, and delay the taxes on medical device and high-cost health plans for two years. A spending measure must be passed by week's end to avoid a government shutdown.

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health insurance