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1/17/2018

Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin signed an executive order Friday instructing the Health and Family Services Cabinet to terminate the state's Medicaid expansion, which provides coverage for more than 400,000 people, if a court strikes down any part of the state's Medicaid waiver, which allows the state to impose work requirements on program enrollees. The National Health Law Program and other advocacy groups say they will sue if states implementing Medicaid 1115 waivers reduce the scope of coverage or involuntarily revoke coverage.

1/17/2018

Nutrition often is overlooked as a way to support thyroid function and prevent imbalances, says registered dietitian nutritionist Lisa Markley. Nutrition deficiencies and lifestyle can be factors in thyroid problems, she says, while iodine, tyrosine, selenium and other vitamins, along with foods that provide phytonutrients and antioxidants, can aid thyroid health.

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RDN
1/17/2018

The "Más Fresco," or "more fresh," program run by the University of California, San Diego, provides Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program beneficiaries match money when they purchase fresh fruits and vegetables. UCSD registered dietitian and program Senior Director Joe Prickitt said cost is a barrier to purchasing fresh produce, and the goal of the program is to determine whether more affordable produce leads to better overall health.

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National Public Radio
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UCSD, University of California
1/17/2018

A study in the Journal of the American Medical Association showed that 50% of type 2 diabetes patients with obesity who underwent weight-loss surgery reached targeted blood glucose, cholesterol and blood pressure levels related with diabetes control a year after the procedure, which dropped to 23% at five years; by comparison, 16% of those in the lifestyle intervention group experienced improved diabetes-related health issues after a year, which declined to 4% after five years. Another study in the same journal revealed that those who had weight-loss surgery had an up to 50% lower risk of dying than those who received usual care.

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HealthDay News
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blood glucose, blood pressure
1/17/2018

Researchers found that mothers who breast-fed their babies for at least six months had a 48% reduced risk of developing diabetes, compared with those who did not breast-feed at all. The findings in JAMA Internal Medicine, based on 1,238 mothers without diabetes at baseline, revealed that 10 of every 1,000 women who did not breast-feed at all developed diabetes every year, which declined to less than seven cases per 1,000 women who breast-fed babies for up to six months.

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Reuters
1/17/2018

A study in the journal PNAS found increased body mass index in the US was linked to 186,000 excess deaths in 2011, reducing life expectancy by about 11 months at age 40. Dr. Rekha Kumar commented that while opioid abuse is associated with shorter life expectancy in younger people, obesity contributes to overall lower life expectancy.

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HealthDay News
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opioid abuse
1/17/2018

The Cornell Cooperative Extension of Oneida County will use a New York state grant to boost farm-to-school meal efforts. Among other priorities, plans call for additional staff to help identify ways in which farm-to-school efforts would make financial sense for schools.

1/17/2018

According to a new study published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, more than half of U.S. parents start feeding their babies solid foods before the recommended age of 6 months. Read the full article.

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jandonline.org
1/17/2018

Looking for innovative teaching approaches to engage your students? Join a free webinar on Jan. 30 to learn how to leverage the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Health Informatics Infrastructure as a teaching tool in clinical classroom and supervised practice settings. Sign up.

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eatrightpro.org
1/17/2018

Youths with autism spectrum disorders who were bilingual had significantly better performance in the more difficult part of a computer-based task-shifting test, compared with those who were unilingual, according to a Canadian study in Child Development. The findings suggest that bilingualism may strengthen cognitive flexibility among those with ASD, but more studies are needed, said researcher Ana Maria Gonzalez-Barrero.

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Child Development, researcher