All Health Care News
Top stories summarized by our editors
6/22/2018

Premiums for silver Affordable Care Act plans are expected to increase an average of 15% to $740 next year from $642 in 2018, according to an analysis of 2019 health insurance exchange rate filings in 10 states and Washington, D.C. The analysis by Avalere Health attributed the premium hike to the repeal of the ACA's individual mandate, the administration's decision to halt cost-sharing reduction payments and the lack of federal legislation to stabilize the ACA market despite enrollee risk and structural uncertainties.

Full Story:
HealthLeaders Media
More Summaries:
ACA, Avalere Health
6/22/2018

A study in Neurology found patients with Parkinson's disease who used dopamine agonists had higher rates of impulse control disorders. Based on data for 411 patients, independent associations were between impulse control disorders and treatment duration and average lifetime daily dose.

6/22/2018

Based on data provided by the United Network of Organ Sharing, researchers found that expansion of Medicaid coverage under the Affordable Care Act increased the number of low-income patients with chronic kidney disease included in the new preemptive listings for kidney transplantation, particularly for racial and ethnic minority listings. The findings were reported in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

6/22/2018

Australian researchers found that diabetes was associated with an increased six-month mortality, mechanical ventilation use and ICU admission following any surgery. The findings in Diabetes Care, based on 7,565 surgical inpatients aged at least 54, revealed that each 1% increase in HbA1C correlated with a greater risk for major complications when diabetes was used as a continuous variable, while each percentage increase in HbA1C was associated with an increased length of hospital stay and ICU admission.

More Summaries:
diabetes, Diabetes Care
6/22/2018

Shire's Cinryze, or C1 esterase inhibitor [human], was approved by the FDA for use to prevent attacks in patients with hereditary angioedema who are at least 6 years old. The drug was previously approved for adolescents and adult patients with HAE.

Full Story:
Seeking Alpha
More Summaries:
hereditary angioedema, Shire, FDA
6/22/2018

The CMS is soliciting public comments on how it can reduce the regulatory burden associated with the Stark Law, or the physician self-referral law, particularly aspects of the law that may negatively affect care coordination. "Reviewing the Stark Law regulations is an important step forward to building a value-based system, which is one of Secretary Azar's priorities at HHS," said HHS Deputy Secretary Eric Hargan.

Full Story:
EHR Intelligence
6/22/2018

It is "Take Your Dog to Work Day," and while the event focuses on encouraging pet adoptions, a survey by Wellness Natural Pet Food found 37% of people would give up benefits such as vacation time or a pay raise for the ability to bring their dog to work. There may be health benefits to bringing a pet to work, and Alison Sullivan of Glassdoor says being pet friendly gives employees "flexibility in balancing work and their furry family members."

Full Story:
USA Today
More Summaries:
Glassdoor
6/22/2018

Researchers say planks and crunches are the gold standard exercises for core strengthening. Swedish researcher Martin Eriksson-Crommert said crunches are effective at activating superficial abdominal muscles because the muscle fibers are vertical and line up in sync with the straight-up motion of the exercise.

Full Story:
Shape online
6/22/2018

A study in the American Journal of Gastroenterology found adults whose diets were highest in ultra-processed foods and beverages were more likely to develop irritable bowel syndrome and concomitant functional dyspepsia than those who ate the least highly processed foods. People with the highest intake were less likely to follow nutrition recommendations than those with the lowest consumption.

More Summaries:
IBS
6/22/2018

A survey of parents found cancer prevention was the most convincing reason health care providers could give for getting children vaccinated against human papillomavirus, while preventing a common infection and having lasting benefits also garnered support, researchers wrote in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention. The worst reasons providers gave included telling parents the vaccination was a scientific breakthrough and that they had their own child vaccinated.